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Meeru Dhalwala’s Next Dish

Meeru Dhalwala’s Next Dish

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Photos by Grant Harder.

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n a strange way, Meeru Dhalwala found the beginning of the pandemic relaxing. “It was the first time in 27 years I wasn’t worrying about the restaurant,” she explains, gesturing to the dining room of Vij’s, where she’s drinking a steaming cup of fragrant chai on an unseasonably cold April morning. “Having a restaurant is like having children—some part of your brain is always occupied by thinking about them. But this was out of my hands. My phone wasn’t going to buzz about work at midnight; no one was going to wake me up at 6:00 a.m. I actually slept well.”

It’s understandable that Dhalwala was ready for a break. In 1995, her then-husband Vikram Vij had just opened his first restaurant, a tiny 14-seat space on West Broadway. (Dhalwala and Vij divorced in 2017 but remain friends and business partners.) “He wasn’t doing Indian food yet,” she remembers. “You know those chickens that are splayed out on a spit, rotating around and around in a little container?” Dhalwala had moved from Washington, DC, where she worked in international development, to be with Vij. She had no experience in restaurants, but she jumped in with both feet: running the kitchen at Vij’s and coming up with new recipes that featured rich, complex Indian flavours—including those famed lamb popsicles—and ingredients from local producers.

Running a restaurant described by The New York Times as “easily among the finest Indian restaurants in the world” sounds like more than enough to keep any duo busy. But Dhalwala and Vij were also raising two daughters, opening new restaurants—including the beloved Rangoli, which closed early in the pandemic, and Surrey’s beloved My Shanti—and co-authoring cookbooks. A passionate advocate for sustainability, Dhalwala also joined the advisory board of UBC’s Faculty of Land and Food Systems; in 2011, she launched an annual festival Joy of Feeding to raise money for the university’s farm.

All the while, Vij’s remained at the heart of her work and life. But when restaurants closed in March 2020, Dhalwala found herself unoccupied for the first time in years. She discovered binge-watching, devouring the first two seasons of My Brilliant Friend on HBO, and spent time with her daughter, who was home from university due to the lockdown. Soon, though, her mind turned to another idea that had been simmering in the background for years: baby food.

“That became my pandemic project,” Dhalwala says. “I would come into Vij’s, because we were closed, and experiment with different recipes. I would just sit down, close my eyes, and write about all my different experiences that go into baby foods. And then when we reopened, at the end of May, I invited neighbourhood moms to bring their babies in and try the recipes.” 

She called her new project My Bambiri, which means “spinning top” in Punjabi.  “As a kid, my nickname was Meeri Bambiri,” says Dhalwala. “Because as soon as I could eat, I wanted to eat with people. I was so social, I would just bounce around.” My Bambiri is a natural extension of Dhalwala’s passion for sustainability, which begins at the kitchen table. Ensuring the first foods that babies eat are flavourful, local, and nutritious provides a foundation for healthy eating habits that support community food systems. Her kitchen experiments evolved into four simple recipes: Blueberry and Sunflower Seed, Lentil and Basmati Rice, Beets and Lentils, and Apple and Teff (an ancient grain from Ethiopia).

Dhalwala credits her long-time supplier and friend, Naty King of Hazelmere Organic Farm, with sourcing local producers for My Bambiri. “I’m the queen delegator,” she jokes. “I said, ‘Find me a small B.C. farmer. It doesn’t have to be organic, but it has to be a sustainable farm with beautiful soil.’” To Dhalwala’s delight, King found “a tiny blueberry farm: a little one-person operation with just three acres” to provide the organic blueberries for one of the recipes.

What sets My Bambiri apart from other organic baby food options, according to Dhalwala, is the craft and the quality. “I hand-cooked mine—like, I cooked it myself, stirring each pot to make sure it wouldn’t get overcooked,” she says, laughing. “But really, it’s the ingredients. I made everything so carefully—the Apple and Teff has organic dates, just enough to sweeten it up. And I use Japanese murasaki sweet potatoes, because in my research I found they were the most nutritious.” Every ingredient was carefully chosen. “And here’s the secret,” she offers. “Add a little bit of salt and butter, and you can eat it, too! It’s really good.” 

How food is produced is an important part of sustainability, but Dhalwala is equally concerned with the other half of the equation: ensuring that it doesn’t go to waste. “We have virtually zero food waste [at the restaurant],” she says. “My staff are all from India. I grew up in the United States, but my mom and dad were in refugee camps; they grew up with famine. We just don’t waste food here. If we have leftovers, or we made a mistake with a dish, someone takes it home.”

“If I just sell to parents who have high incomes, I haven't accomplished anything.”

To ensure My Bambiri byproducts find a home, too, Dhalwala partnered with Food Stash Foundation: a nonprofit organization located just a few blocks north of Vij’s in Olympic Village. Each month, Food Stash Foundation recovers 70,000 pounds of perishable foods and produce that businesses would otherwise throw away, and redistributes it through local charities, grocery deliveries, and a weekly community market. “That’s food that would otherwise go in the landfill,” says Dhalwala. “When I saw their freezer, it was just full of salmon and chicken. I thought, ‘Gosh, we’re killing the animal, and then we’re just throwing it in the garbage.’” Every Friday, Dhalwala donates leftover My Bambiri products to Food Stash for their pay-what-you-can market.

Dhalwala’s approach with My Bambiri puts community above profits, which is why she decided to try an unusual pricing model. “If I just sell to parents who have high incomes, I haven't accomplished anything. I already run a business for profit,” she explains, gesturing to the restaurant. “So that’s when I came up with income-based pricing.” My Bambiri products are sold in packs of 12, with the option of paying $24, $42, or $60; Dhalwala is taking an honour-system approach of trusting customers to pay what they think is fair.

“And if that income-based model works, maybe others will try it, too,” she muses. “How cool would it be if one day you could come to Vij’s, and you could trust your community enough that somebody making $400,000 a year will pay $60 for those lamb popsicles, and someone making $40,000 will pay $24 for that dish—but we’re all dining together, as equals?”

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Meeru Dhalwala’s Next Dish

Meeru Dhalwala’s Next Dish
How baby food became the veteran chef’s latest passion project.
Meeru Dhalwala’s Next Dish
Written by

Photos by Grant Harder.

I

n a strange way, Meeru Dhalwala found the beginning of the pandemic relaxing. “It was the first time in 27 years I wasn’t worrying about the restaurant,” she explains, gesturing to the dining room of Vij’s, where she’s drinking a steaming cup of fragrant chai on an unseasonably cold April morning. “Having a restaurant is like having children—some part of your brain is always occupied by thinking about them. But this was out of my hands. My phone wasn’t going to buzz about work at midnight; no one was going to wake me up at 6:00 a.m. I actually slept well.”

It’s understandable that Dhalwala was ready for a break. In 1995, her then-husband Vikram Vij had just opened his first restaurant, a tiny 14-seat space on West Broadway. (Dhalwala and Vij divorced in 2017 but remain friends and business partners.) “He wasn’t doing Indian food yet,” she remembers. “You know those chickens that are splayed out on a spit, rotating around and around in a little container?” Dhalwala had moved from Washington, DC, where she worked in international development, to be with Vij. She had no experience in restaurants, but she jumped in with both feet: running the kitchen at Vij’s and coming up with new recipes that featured rich, complex Indian flavours—including those famed lamb popsicles—and ingredients from local producers.

Running a restaurant described by The New York Times as “easily among the finest Indian restaurants in the world” sounds like more than enough to keep any duo busy. But Dhalwala and Vij were also raising two daughters, opening new restaurants—including the beloved Rangoli, which closed early in the pandemic, and Surrey’s beloved My Shanti—and co-authoring cookbooks. A passionate advocate for sustainability, Dhalwala also joined the advisory board of UBC’s Faculty of Land and Food Systems; in 2011, she launched an annual festival Joy of Feeding to raise money for the university’s farm.

All the while, Vij’s remained at the heart of her work and life. But when restaurants closed in March 2020, Dhalwala found herself unoccupied for the first time in years. She discovered binge-watching, devouring the first two seasons of My Brilliant Friend on HBO, and spent time with her daughter, who was home from university due to the lockdown. Soon, though, her mind turned to another idea that had been simmering in the background for years: baby food.

“That became my pandemic project,” Dhalwala says. “I would come into Vij’s, because we were closed, and experiment with different recipes. I would just sit down, close my eyes, and write about all my different experiences that go into baby foods. And then when we reopened, at the end of May, I invited neighbourhood moms to bring their babies in and try the recipes.” 

She called her new project My Bambiri, which means “spinning top” in Punjabi.  “As a kid, my nickname was Meeri Bambiri,” says Dhalwala. “Because as soon as I could eat, I wanted to eat with people. I was so social, I would just bounce around.” My Bambiri is a natural extension of Dhalwala’s passion for sustainability, which begins at the kitchen table. Ensuring the first foods that babies eat are flavourful, local, and nutritious provides a foundation for healthy eating habits that support community food systems. Her kitchen experiments evolved into four simple recipes: Blueberry and Sunflower Seed, Lentil and Basmati Rice, Beets and Lentils, and Apple and Teff (an ancient grain from Ethiopia).

Dhalwala credits her long-time supplier and friend, Naty King of Hazelmere Organic Farm, with sourcing local producers for My Bambiri. “I’m the queen delegator,” she jokes. “I said, ‘Find me a small B.C. farmer. It doesn’t have to be organic, but it has to be a sustainable farm with beautiful soil.’” To Dhalwala’s delight, King found “a tiny blueberry farm: a little one-person operation with just three acres” to provide the organic blueberries for one of the recipes.

What sets My Bambiri apart from other organic baby food options, according to Dhalwala, is the craft and the quality. “I hand-cooked mine—like, I cooked it myself, stirring each pot to make sure it wouldn’t get overcooked,” she says, laughing. “But really, it’s the ingredients. I made everything so carefully—the Apple and Teff has organic dates, just enough to sweeten it up. And I use Japanese murasaki sweet potatoes, because in my research I found they were the most nutritious.” Every ingredient was carefully chosen. “And here’s the secret,” she offers. “Add a little bit of salt and butter, and you can eat it, too! It’s really good.” 

How food is produced is an important part of sustainability, but Dhalwala is equally concerned with the other half of the equation: ensuring that it doesn’t go to waste. “We have virtually zero food waste [at the restaurant],” she says. “My staff are all from India. I grew up in the United States, but my mom and dad were in refugee camps; they grew up with famine. We just don’t waste food here. If we have leftovers, or we made a mistake with a dish, someone takes it home.”

“If I just sell to parents who have high incomes, I haven't accomplished anything.”

To ensure My Bambiri byproducts find a home, too, Dhalwala partnered with Food Stash Foundation: a nonprofit organization located just a few blocks north of Vij’s in Olympic Village. Each month, Food Stash Foundation recovers 70,000 pounds of perishable foods and produce that businesses would otherwise throw away, and redistributes it through local charities, grocery deliveries, and a weekly community market. “That’s food that would otherwise go in the landfill,” says Dhalwala. “When I saw their freezer, it was just full of salmon and chicken. I thought, ‘Gosh, we’re killing the animal, and then we’re just throwing it in the garbage.’” Every Friday, Dhalwala donates leftover My Bambiri products to Food Stash for their pay-what-you-can market.

Dhalwala’s approach with My Bambiri puts community above profits, which is why she decided to try an unusual pricing model. “If I just sell to parents who have high incomes, I haven't accomplished anything. I already run a business for profit,” she explains, gesturing to the restaurant. “So that’s when I came up with income-based pricing.” My Bambiri products are sold in packs of 12, with the option of paying $24, $42, or $60; Dhalwala is taking an honour-system approach of trusting customers to pay what they think is fair.

“And if that income-based model works, maybe others will try it, too,” she muses. “How cool would it be if one day you could come to Vij’s, and you could trust your community enough that somebody making $400,000 a year will pay $60 for those lamb popsicles, and someone making $40,000 will pay $24 for that dish—but we’re all dining together, as equals?”

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Meeru Dhalwala’s Next Dish

Meeru Dhalwala’s Next Dish

How baby food became the veteran chef’s latest passion project.
Written by
/

Photos by Grant Harder.

I

n a strange way, Meeru Dhalwala found the beginning of the pandemic relaxing. “It was the first time in 27 years I wasn’t worrying about the restaurant,” she explains, gesturing to the dining room of Vij’s, where she’s drinking a steaming cup of fragrant chai on an unseasonably cold April morning. “Having a restaurant is like having children—some part of your brain is always occupied by thinking about them. But this was out of my hands. My phone wasn’t going to buzz about work at midnight; no one was going to wake me up at 6:00 a.m. I actually slept well.”

It’s understandable that Dhalwala was ready for a break. In 1995, her then-husband Vikram Vij had just opened his first restaurant, a tiny 14-seat space on West Broadway. (Dhalwala and Vij divorced in 2017 but remain friends and business partners.) “He wasn’t doing Indian food yet,” she remembers. “You know those chickens that are splayed out on a spit, rotating around and around in a little container?” Dhalwala had moved from Washington, DC, where she worked in international development, to be with Vij. She had no experience in restaurants, but she jumped in with both feet: running the kitchen at Vij’s and coming up with new recipes that featured rich, complex Indian flavours—including those famed lamb popsicles—and ingredients from local producers.

Running a restaurant described by The New York Times as “easily among the finest Indian restaurants in the world” sounds like more than enough to keep any duo busy. But Dhalwala and Vij were also raising two daughters, opening new restaurants—including the beloved Rangoli, which closed early in the pandemic, and Surrey’s beloved My Shanti—and co-authoring cookbooks. A passionate advocate for sustainability, Dhalwala also joined the advisory board of UBC’s Faculty of Land and Food Systems; in 2011, she launched an annual festival Joy of Feeding to raise money for the university’s farm.

All the while, Vij’s remained at the heart of her work and life. But when restaurants closed in March 2020, Dhalwala found herself unoccupied for the first time in years. She discovered binge-watching, devouring the first two seasons of My Brilliant Friend on HBO, and spent time with her daughter, who was home from university due to the lockdown. Soon, though, her mind turned to another idea that had been simmering in the background for years: baby food.

“That became my pandemic project,” Dhalwala says. “I would come into Vij’s, because we were closed, and experiment with different recipes. I would just sit down, close my eyes, and write about all my different experiences that go into baby foods. And then when we reopened, at the end of May, I invited neighbourhood moms to bring their babies in and try the recipes.” 

She called her new project My Bambiri, which means “spinning top” in Punjabi.  “As a kid, my nickname was Meeri Bambiri,” says Dhalwala. “Because as soon as I could eat, I wanted to eat with people. I was so social, I would just bounce around.” My Bambiri is a natural extension of Dhalwala’s passion for sustainability, which begins at the kitchen table. Ensuring the first foods that babies eat are flavourful, local, and nutritious provides a foundation for healthy eating habits that support community food systems. Her kitchen experiments evolved into four simple recipes: Blueberry and Sunflower Seed, Lentil and Basmati Rice, Beets and Lentils, and Apple and Teff (an ancient grain from Ethiopia).

Dhalwala credits her long-time supplier and friend, Naty King of Hazelmere Organic Farm, with sourcing local producers for My Bambiri. “I’m the queen delegator,” she jokes. “I said, ‘Find me a small B.C. farmer. It doesn’t have to be organic, but it has to be a sustainable farm with beautiful soil.’” To Dhalwala’s delight, King found “a tiny blueberry farm: a little one-person operation with just three acres” to provide the organic blueberries for one of the recipes.

What sets My Bambiri apart from other organic baby food options, according to Dhalwala, is the craft and the quality. “I hand-cooked mine—like, I cooked it myself, stirring each pot to make sure it wouldn’t get overcooked,” she says, laughing. “But really, it’s the ingredients. I made everything so carefully—the Apple and Teff has organic dates, just enough to sweeten it up. And I use Japanese murasaki sweet potatoes, because in my research I found they were the most nutritious.” Every ingredient was carefully chosen. “And here’s the secret,” she offers. “Add a little bit of salt and butter, and you can eat it, too! It’s really good.” 

How food is produced is an important part of sustainability, but Dhalwala is equally concerned with the other half of the equation: ensuring that it doesn’t go to waste. “We have virtually zero food waste [at the restaurant],” she says. “My staff are all from India. I grew up in the United States, but my mom and dad were in refugee camps; they grew up with famine. We just don’t waste food here. If we have leftovers, or we made a mistake with a dish, someone takes it home.”

“If I just sell to parents who have high incomes, I haven't accomplished anything.”

To ensure My Bambiri byproducts find a home, too, Dhalwala partnered with Food Stash Foundation: a nonprofit organization located just a few blocks north of Vij’s in Olympic Village. Each month, Food Stash Foundation recovers 70,000 pounds of perishable foods and produce that businesses would otherwise throw away, and redistributes it through local charities, grocery deliveries, and a weekly community market. “That’s food that would otherwise go in the landfill,” says Dhalwala. “When I saw their freezer, it was just full of salmon and chicken. I thought, ‘Gosh, we’re killing the animal, and then we’re just throwing it in the garbage.’” Every Friday, Dhalwala donates leftover My Bambiri products to Food Stash for their pay-what-you-can market.

Dhalwala’s approach with My Bambiri puts community above profits, which is why she decided to try an unusual pricing model. “If I just sell to parents who have high incomes, I haven't accomplished anything. I already run a business for profit,” she explains, gesturing to the restaurant. “So that’s when I came up with income-based pricing.” My Bambiri products are sold in packs of 12, with the option of paying $24, $42, or $60; Dhalwala is taking an honour-system approach of trusting customers to pay what they think is fair.

“And if that income-based model works, maybe others will try it, too,” she muses. “How cool would it be if one day you could come to Vij’s, and you could trust your community enough that somebody making $400,000 a year will pay $60 for those lamb popsicles, and someone making $40,000 will pay $24 for that dish—but we’re all dining together, as equals?”

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Food & Beverage
Rooted (Part 1): Matron Fine Beer
A two-part video series exploring the people, their practices, the place and the part food plays in a post-pandemic world.
Rooted (Part 1): Matron Fine Beer
Food & Beverage
Rooted (Part 1): Matron Fine Beer
A two-part video series exploring the people, their practices, the place and the part food plays in a post-pandemic world.
Food & Beverage
Rooted (Part 1): Matron Fine Beer
Rooted (Part 1): Matron Fine Beer
A two-part video series exploring the people, their practices, the place and the part food plays in a post-pandemic world.
Food & Beverage
Rooted (Part 1): Matron Fine Beer
A two-part video series exploring the people, their practices, the place and the part food plays in a post-pandemic world.
A Blueberry Bush On Every Corner
Fresh Perspectives
A Blueberry Bush On Every Corner
What’s it like to live in a place where everyone truly knows your name, and probably a little about you too?
A Blueberry Bush On Every Corner
Fresh Perspectives
A Blueberry Bush On Every Corner
What’s it like to live in a place where everyone truly knows your name, and probably a little about you too?
Fresh Perspectives
A Blueberry Bush On Every Corner
A Blueberry Bush On Every Corner
What’s it like to live in a place where everyone truly knows your name, and probably a little about you too?
Fresh Perspectives
A Blueberry Bush On Every Corner
What’s it like to live in a place where everyone truly knows your name, and probably a little about you too?
Commissary Kitchen
Places & Spaces
Commissary Kitchen
For many entrepreneurs, the early stages of a budding business start at home. Makers toil away in whatever spaces they have and while this might come as an easy feat to some, others find themselves struggling to create.
Commissary Kitchen
Places & Spaces
Commissary Kitchen
For many entrepreneurs, the early stages of a budding business start at home. Makers toil away in whatever spaces they have and while this might come as an easy feat to some, others find themselves struggling to create.
Places & Spaces
Commissary Kitchen
Commissary Kitchen
For many entrepreneurs, the early stages of a budding business start at home. Makers toil away in whatever spaces they have and while this might come as an easy feat to some, others find themselves struggling to create.
Places & Spaces
Commissary Kitchen
For many entrepreneurs, the early stages of a budding business start at home. Makers toil away in whatever spaces they have and while this might come as an easy feat to some, others find themselves struggling to create.
Save The Seeds
Farming & Agriculture
Save The Seeds
The integration of GMO seeds in growing has been on the rise for 60+ years and although they come in a pretty package, they won’t sustain humans or the planet long-term. 
Save The Seeds
Farming & Agriculture
Save The Seeds
The integration of GMO seeds in growing has been on the rise for 60+ years and although they come in a pretty package, they won’t sustain humans or the planet long-term. 
Farming & Agriculture
Save The Seeds
Save The Seeds
The integration of GMO seeds in growing has been on the rise for 60+ years and although they come in a pretty package, they won’t sustain humans or the planet long-term. 
Farming & Agriculture
Save The Seeds
The integration of GMO seeds in growing has been on the rise for 60+ years and although they come in a pretty package, they won’t sustain humans or the planet long-term. 
Salt Of The Earth
Farming & Agriculture
Salt Of The Earth
Seaweed: when it’s good, it doesn’t taste slimy.
Salt Of The Earth
Farming & Agriculture
Salt Of The Earth
Seaweed: when it’s good, it doesn’t taste slimy.
Farming & Agriculture
Salt Of The Earth
Salt Of The Earth
Seaweed: when it’s good, it doesn’t taste slimy.
Farming & Agriculture
Salt Of The Earth
Seaweed: when it’s good, it doesn’t taste slimy.
A Bread Affair
Food & Beverage
A Bread Affair
With decades of fad diets telling us that carbs are bad, bread has gotten a pretty bad rap.
A Bread Affair
Food & Beverage
A Bread Affair
With decades of fad diets telling us that carbs are bad, bread has gotten a pretty bad rap.
Food & Beverage
A Bread Affair
A Bread Affair
With decades of fad diets telling us that carbs are bad, bread has gotten a pretty bad rap.
Food & Beverage
A Bread Affair
With decades of fad diets telling us that carbs are bad, bread has gotten a pretty bad rap.
Room to Grow
Farming & Agriculture
Room to Grow
A first of it's kind, this University-led farm school wants to build community through sustainable agriculture and a commitment to restoring the land around them.
Room to Grow
Farming & Agriculture
Room to Grow
A first of it's kind, this University-led farm school wants to build community through sustainable agriculture and a commitment to restoring the land around them.
Farming & Agriculture
Room to Grow
Room to Grow
A first of it's kind, this University-led farm school wants to build community through sustainable agriculture and a commitment to restoring the land around them.
Farming & Agriculture
Room to Grow
A first of it's kind, this University-led farm school wants to build community through sustainable agriculture and a commitment to restoring the land around them.
The Restaurant With No Menu
Food & Beverage
The Restaurant With No Menu
Run by chef Dylan Watson-Brawn, Ernst Berlin is the restaurant with no menu.
The Restaurant With No Menu
Food & Beverage
The Restaurant With No Menu
Run by chef Dylan Watson-Brawn, Ernst Berlin is the restaurant with no menu.
Food & Beverage
The Restaurant With No Menu
The Restaurant With No Menu
Run by chef Dylan Watson-Brawn, Ernst Berlin is the restaurant with no menu.
Food & Beverage
The Restaurant With No Menu
Run by chef Dylan Watson-Brawn, Ernst Berlin is the restaurant with no menu.
Beyond The "Bread Boom"
Fresh Perspectives
Beyond The "Bread Boom"
An intimate look at the benefits of cooking at home beyond an Instagram feed.
Beyond The "Bread Boom"
Fresh Perspectives
Beyond The "Bread Boom"
An intimate look at the benefits of cooking at home beyond an Instagram feed.
Fresh Perspectives
Beyond The "Bread Boom"
Beyond The "Bread Boom"
An intimate look at the benefits of cooking at home beyond an Instagram feed.
Fresh Perspectives
Beyond The "Bread Boom"
An intimate look at the benefits of cooking at home beyond an Instagram feed.
Urban Growers
Farming & Agriculture
Urban Growers
A look at how and why market gardening, community supported agriculture, and growing our own food is the way of the future.
Urban Growers
Farming & Agriculture
Urban Growers
A look at how and why market gardening, community supported agriculture, and growing our own food is the way of the future.
Farming & Agriculture
Urban Growers
Urban Growers
A look at how and why market gardening, community supported agriculture, and growing our own food is the way of the future.
Farming & Agriculture
Urban Growers
A look at how and why market gardening, community supported agriculture, and growing our own food is the way of the future.
Lo-TEK Design by Radical Indigenism
Fresh Perspectives
Lo-TEK Design by Radical Indigenism
“In an era of high-tech and climate extremes, we are drowning in information while starving for wisdom.”
Lo-TEK Design by Radical Indigenism
Fresh Perspectives
Lo-TEK Design by Radical Indigenism
“In an era of high-tech and climate extremes, we are drowning in information while starving for wisdom.”
Fresh Perspectives
Lo-TEK Design by Radical Indigenism
Lo-TEK Design by Radical Indigenism
“In an era of high-tech and climate extremes, we are drowning in information while starving for wisdom.”
Fresh Perspectives
Lo-TEK Design by Radical Indigenism
“In an era of high-tech and climate extremes, we are drowning in information while starving for wisdom.”
From Sea to Table
Food & Beverage
From Sea to Table
From watching fishmongers unpack their daily catches in PEI, to perfecting her clam chowder, seafood has long been a part of Chef Charlotte’s life.
From Sea to Table
Food & Beverage
From Sea to Table
From watching fishmongers unpack their daily catches in PEI, to perfecting her clam chowder, seafood has long been a part of Chef Charlotte’s life.
Food & Beverage
From Sea to Table
From Sea to Table
From watching fishmongers unpack their daily catches in PEI, to perfecting her clam chowder, seafood has long been a part of Chef Charlotte’s life.
Food & Beverage
From Sea to Table
From watching fishmongers unpack their daily catches in PEI, to perfecting her clam chowder, seafood has long been a part of Chef Charlotte’s life.
Fisherman Frank
Farming & Agriculture
Fisherman Frank
From fisherman to food truck owner, Frank knows a good catch when he sees it.
Fisherman Frank
Farming & Agriculture
Fisherman Frank
From fisherman to food truck owner, Frank knows a good catch when he sees it.
Farming & Agriculture
Fisherman Frank
Fisherman Frank
From fisherman to food truck owner, Frank knows a good catch when he sees it.
Farming & Agriculture
Fisherman Frank
From fisherman to food truck owner, Frank knows a good catch when he sees it.
Coffee Snob
Fresh Perspectives
Coffee Snob
For as long as sustainability has been a topic of conversation, the question of what exactly it entails and how it can be achieved remains somewhat clouded—and truthfully there isn’t a perfect silver bullet of an answer.
Coffee Snob
Fresh Perspectives
Coffee Snob
For as long as sustainability has been a topic of conversation, the question of what exactly it entails and how it can be achieved remains somewhat clouded—and truthfully there isn’t a perfect silver bullet of an answer.
Fresh Perspectives
Coffee Snob
Coffee Snob
For as long as sustainability has been a topic of conversation, the question of what exactly it entails and how it can be achieved remains somewhat clouded—and truthfully there isn’t a perfect silver bullet of an answer.
Fresh Perspectives
Coffee Snob
For as long as sustainability has been a topic of conversation, the question of what exactly it entails and how it can be achieved remains somewhat clouded—and truthfully there isn’t a perfect silver bullet of an answer.
Freshly Milled
Food & Beverage
Freshly Milled
#EdibleTransparency: a simple hashtag with a big impact on the future of food that also serves as the ethos for Flourist, a Vancouver-based bakery, flour mill, coffee shop, pantry, and all around powerhouse.
Freshly Milled
Food & Beverage
Freshly Milled
#EdibleTransparency: a simple hashtag with a big impact on the future of food that also serves as the ethos for Flourist, a Vancouver-based bakery, flour mill, coffee shop, pantry, and all around powerhouse.
Food & Beverage
Freshly Milled
Freshly Milled
#EdibleTransparency: a simple hashtag with a big impact on the future of food that also serves as the ethos for Flourist, a Vancouver-based bakery, flour mill, coffee shop, pantry, and all around powerhouse.
Food & Beverage
Freshly Milled
#EdibleTransparency: a simple hashtag with a big impact on the future of food that also serves as the ethos for Flourist, a Vancouver-based bakery, flour mill, coffee shop, pantry, and all around powerhouse.
City Grown
Farming & Agriculture
City Grown
A subway ride away from the heart of downtown Toronto, step off the Line 1 platform at Pioneer Village Station and it’s an easy walk to Black Creek Community Farm (BCCF).
City Grown
Farming & Agriculture
City Grown
A subway ride away from the heart of downtown Toronto, step off the Line 1 platform at Pioneer Village Station and it’s an easy walk to Black Creek Community Farm (BCCF).
Farming & Agriculture
City Grown
City Grown
A subway ride away from the heart of downtown Toronto, step off the Line 1 platform at Pioneer Village Station and it’s an easy walk to Black Creek Community Farm (BCCF).
Farming & Agriculture
City Grown
A subway ride away from the heart of downtown Toronto, step off the Line 1 platform at Pioneer Village Station and it’s an easy walk to Black Creek Community Farm (BCCF).
For The Love Of Food
Farming & Agriculture
For The Love Of Food
It’s no secret that farming is tough, but the fruits (and vegetables) of your labour make it all worth it, according to two veteran farmers.
For The Love Of Food
Farming & Agriculture
For The Love Of Food
It’s no secret that farming is tough, but the fruits (and vegetables) of your labour make it all worth it, according to two veteran farmers.
Farming & Agriculture
For The Love Of Food
For The Love Of Food
It’s no secret that farming is tough, but the fruits (and vegetables) of your labour make it all worth it, according to two veteran farmers.
Farming & Agriculture
For The Love Of Food
It’s no secret that farming is tough, but the fruits (and vegetables) of your labour make it all worth it, according to two veteran farmers.
Cross-Pollination
Art & Design
Cross-Pollination
For many consumers, buying a bee emblazoned t-shirt is enough to add to the cause, but for some they feel that more needs to be done.
Cross-Pollination
Art & Design
Cross-Pollination
For many consumers, buying a bee emblazoned t-shirt is enough to add to the cause, but for some they feel that more needs to be done.
Art & Design
Cross-Pollination
Cross-Pollination
For many consumers, buying a bee emblazoned t-shirt is enough to add to the cause, but for some they feel that more needs to be done.
Art & Design
Cross-Pollination
For many consumers, buying a bee emblazoned t-shirt is enough to add to the cause, but for some they feel that more needs to be done.
How Food Can Save The World
Farming & Agriculture
How Food Can Save The World
What makes a good life, and what does it mean to eat well? For Carolyn Steel, the key to unlocking the truths behind these perennial uncertainties is Sitopia.
How Food Can Save The World
Farming & Agriculture
How Food Can Save The World
What makes a good life, and what does it mean to eat well? For Carolyn Steel, the key to unlocking the truths behind these perennial uncertainties is Sitopia.
Farming & Agriculture
How Food Can Save The World
How Food Can Save The World
What makes a good life, and what does it mean to eat well? For Carolyn Steel, the key to unlocking the truths behind these perennial uncertainties is Sitopia.
Farming & Agriculture
How Food Can Save The World
What makes a good life, and what does it mean to eat well? For Carolyn Steel, the key to unlocking the truths behind these perennial uncertainties is Sitopia.
Stop And Smell The Wild Roses
Art & Design
Stop And Smell The Wild Roses
While major corporations seek out land for large scale lumber and minerals, B.C. artisans like Leigh Joseph look for resources with a deeper, spiritual connection.
Stop And Smell The Wild Roses
Art & Design
Stop And Smell The Wild Roses
While major corporations seek out land for large scale lumber and minerals, B.C. artisans like Leigh Joseph look for resources with a deeper, spiritual connection.
Art & Design
Stop And Smell The Wild Roses
Stop And Smell The Wild Roses
While major corporations seek out land for large scale lumber and minerals, B.C. artisans like Leigh Joseph look for resources with a deeper, spiritual connection.
Art & Design
Stop And Smell The Wild Roses
While major corporations seek out land for large scale lumber and minerals, B.C. artisans like Leigh Joseph look for resources with a deeper, spiritual connection.